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September 12, 2013

Set Your Very Own World Record

Written by Dena Evans
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Siberianicemarathon

Ever feel frustrated about the limitations of your human body?  Ever wonder what you have in common with the Olympians atop the marathon podium?

 

Although most of us may not be able to break the tape in front of a stadium full of people, there are amazing feats accomplished by every day people all the time.  Here are a few extreme performances to captivate your imagination.  Find your strength and your niche, and you never know, you could be on this list!

 

You're Never too old to start!

In just over eight hours, Fauja Singh completed the 2011 Toronto Waterfront Marathon at age 100.  He was rather fresh, however, as he just started competing at the ripe young age of 89.

 

The conditions don’t have to stop you!

If you think your region gets cold in winter, be encouraged you aren’t training for the Siberian Ice Marathon.  800 participants are expected to converge in Omsk, Siberia on January 7 for a half marathon in temperatures that average -20°--40° C.  In 2000 Jay Tuck became the first American to finish the race, and in 2001, the temperature of -42° C meant that of the 223 registered participants, 134 showed up to the starting line and a mere 11 finished.  Hard core! (Photo credit:  My Next Run)

 

Diluted sports drink still too much for your stomach?  Avoid this race…

Each year since 2004, Raleigh, North Carolina runners have contested the Krispy Kreme challenge, consisting of 2.5 miles out, a stop to consume a full dozen doughnuts, and 2.5 miles back.  Keep it all down and do it under an hour to earn prizes.  Demonstrating both internal and external fortitude this year, Tim Ryan did all that in a winning 31:30.

 

Carry a golf club, set a record!

Chris Smith is the current Speedgolf record holder with a 5 under 65 in 44 minutes (scoring is done by adding score and time), but this year, Olympic medalists Bernard Lagat and Nick Willis are headed to the World Championships in Oregon (October 26 and 27).  Will the ability to run a sub 3:50 mile make the difference and lower the current 18-hole record?  We’ll have to tune into find out!  For the ladies, the top finisher last year was Gretchen Johnson with an 84 / 55:16.

 

Good at downhill running?

If you are good at downhills, take a look at the Everest Marathon…that is if you can endure a start altitude of over 17,000 feet!  This race goes from 17,149 to 11,300 feet.  If you can make it through the cold and the altitude effects, you might be able to challenge the Nepalese athlete who ran 3:41 for the win last year.

 

Even if you aren’t fast, you’re still an athlete!

Kelly Gneiting needed over nine hours to complete the 2011 Los Angeles Marathon (memorable for extremely rainy, windy conditions), which may seem pretty slow until you factor in his weight – 430 lbs!  A sumo wrestler, Gneiting destroyed the old record of 275 lbs. (according to the LA Times, he weighed in a 396 after the race).  While we recommend following the advice of medical professionals when taking on extreme challenges to the body, we have to admire his mental toughness to improve on his personal best by 2 hours (from 11:52 to 9:48) in the process.

 

Want to set a Guinness World Record?  Make one up and set it yourself!

The Virgin Money London Marathon has become famous for fast times, but toward the back of the pack, even more records are set each year in a long list of irreverent, but yes, official world records.  As a sampling, the 2011 edition featured records set in the categories of: fastest marathon run by a person dressed as Mr. Potato Head, a sailor, a nurse (male), as a bottle (male), as an astronaut, as a vegetable (female), as a Viking, as a lifeguard, in a police uniform, as a Roman solider (3:09!), wearing a gas mask, in a wedding dress, in an animal costume (female), as a television character (female), as a fairy (male), as a fairy (female), as Dennis the Menace (3:02!), as a cartoon character (Fred Flinstone for 2:46 – smoking!), as a book character, as an ostrich, as a jester, as a super hero (2:42 for the win), as a nun, carrying a 40lb pack, carrying a 60lb pack, moving on crutches (one leg), and number of solved Rubik’s Cubes (that would be 100 in 4:45 for the finish).

 

Don’t see your favorite fancy dress outfit here?  Looking for a way to let your particular skill set shine?  Check the book, find the race that fits your passion, and set your own kind of personal best and world record next time out!

 

 

 

 

Last modified on November 29, 1999
Dena Evans

Dena Evans

Dena Evans joined runcoach in July, 2008 and has a wide range of experience working with athletes of all stripes- from youth to veteran division competitors, novice to international caliber athletes.

From 1999-2005, she served on the Stanford Track & Field/ Cross Country staff. Dena earned NCAA Women’s Cross Country Coach of the Year honors in 2003 as Stanford won the NCAA Division I Championship. She was named Pac-10 Cross Country Coach of the Year in 2003-04, and West Regional Coach of the Year in 2004.

From 2006-08, she worked with the Bay Area Women’s Sports Initiative, helping to expand the after school fitness programs for elementary school aged girls to Mountain View, East Menlo Park, and Redwood City. She has also served both the Stanford Center on Ethics and the Stanford Center on the Legal Profession as a program coordinator.

Dena graduated from Stanford in 1996.

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